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    COMPANY OVERVIEW

    Welcome to a uniquely experimental travel and fashion brand! We are committed to showcasing some of the most exciting local fashion trends from all around the world.

    What Anthony Bourdain does for the gastronomic world, ALIAKIM’s Common Thread Project aims to do for the world of fashion. Going beyond superficial fashion and diving deep into cities worldwide, we act as fashion anthropologists, finding the style that encapsulates a community’s vibes.

    How do we do this, you ask?

    Part One: We have an exciting editorial component where we feature popular local fashionistas, designers and boutiques with the goal of exposing the internationally-minded to new, exciting fashion trends from cultures outside of their own. We also break down the historical, cultural, and sociological roots behind why certain communities wear what they wear. Basically, we give you the #WearsAndWhys! You can find this on our Style, Boutique and Blog pages.

    Part Two: Need help finding the best local boutiques and designers for your particular style? Sidewalk Safaris are personalized shopping tours that can transform any local trend into your next major look. Enjoy a VIP shopping experience at some of the best local boutiques with a personal stylist. Meet local fashion designers face-to-face while learning about the unique cultural and sartorial DNA of a particular community.

    Part Three: Now that we’ve turned you into a full fledged fashion tourist, we hope you’ll check out our store, which puts a chic twist on your local souvenir shop. Inspired by the locations, communities and fashionistas that The Common Thread Project visits, we’ve create pieces that blend culturally-specific references with gorgeous fashion elements. Ultimately, we want to represent the experience of local communities through design.

    Our mission is to provide men and women with clothing and accessories that artistically express culture, values and identity. We intend to build our company around communities, and the ways they use fashion as a means to communicate who they are—and what they stand for.

    HARLEM'S STYLE STORY

    Our first featured location is Harlem, NYC. Harlem has always had a distinctive fashion sense, made popular in the 1920’s, with the genesis of the Harlem Renaissance. Blacks moving into the predominately Jewish and Italian enclaves of Harlem quickly established themselves as style mavericks with their zoot suits, fedoras, fringe, feathers and pearls. Known as “Black Dandies”, their well-dressedness spoke sartorial volumes on how they saw themselves and how they wished to be viewed by those in their new community.  For many ambitious blacks in Harlem at this time, fashion served as the only way they could establish a more recognizable position within a society that denied them status. These individuals disavowed playing small or inferior by dressing flamboyantly. Their clothes acted as a cloak that demanded recognition and respect. The complement of both elegance and boldness within their dress exemplified a determined attitude to maintain their dignity.

    Fast forward to today, Harlem continues to be a space of fashion as a means of reasserting self worth. Similar to the 1920’s, a cultural hodgepodge created by gentrification and strong national racial tensions have contributed to an environment where self pride still needs to be asserted through fashion. This first chapter of The Common Thread Project explores the resurgence of Dandyism within current fashion trends made most evident by the returning popularity of fitted suits, wide brim hats and oxfords. Harlem continues to be a space where fashion is used as a rejection of inferiority, as well as a means of asserting value.